Latest New York Times News

  • Alleged second teen mastermind behind Twitter’s 'Bitcoin giveaway' hack
    Alleged second teen mastermind behind Twitter’s 'Bitcoin giveaway' hack
    Graham Ivan Clark may not be the only juvenile responsible for the massive Twitter breach on July 15. The FBI executed a search warrant against a 16-year-old Massachusetts resident in connection with the massive Twitter breach. According to a New York Times report, on Sept.
  • Ripple CEO Fires Back at NYT Reporter, 'Ripple Has No Plans to Reset Our Strategy'
    Ripple CEO Fires Back at NYT Reporter, 'Ripple Has No Plans to Reset Our Strategy'
    Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse says the network is working as planned. Ripple (XRP) CEO Brad Garlinghouse has responded to criticism from New York Times technology reporter Nathaniel Popper after news surfaced that Santander Bank is still hesitant to use the company’s native token XRP. Popper took aim at Garlinghouse, citing statements by the CEO in January 2018 around banks “planning to use [the] XRP token in the near future.” He went on to say that “people used their savings to invest in XRP based on the forward looking projections that Brad Garlinghouse gave,” adding: “If investors put their money into XRP on the day @BradGarlinghouse talked about the banks planning to use XRP — and held it to today — they would have lost around 90% of their investment.” “Ripple has no plans to ‘reset’ our strategy.” In response, Garlinghouse made it clear that he believed “using XRP to solve a $10 trillion problem, like cross-border payments, is working”. The CEO further explained that On-demand Liquidity (ODL, formerly xRapid) has accounted for more than $2 billion in transactions since launch, citing that its volume was up 11 times in the first half of 2020 when compared with the previous first half of 2019. According to Ripple explorer Bloxy, the network has been producing around 900,000 transactions a day during 2020, with a spike of 3,000,000 transactions on Jan.
  • Why Grayscale’s New Digital Currency Ad Could Bring Crypto Investing To Millions
    Why Grayscale’s New Digital Currency Ad Could Bring Crypto Investing To Millions
    Just as Merrill Lynch’s 1948 New York Times ad introduced boomers to stocks, Grayscale’s cable news ad blitz suggests the time is right for digital currency. This morning Grayscale, the worlds largest provider of cryptocurrency investment vehicles, temporarily turned its attention away from hoovering up the supply of Bitcoin to focus on arguably the most intractable problem in all of crypto: getting your stubborn friends and family on board. Last Friday Grayscale founder and CEO Barry Silbert teased a massive ad buy on Twitter with the intention to brrring crypto to the masses and this morning he delivered, with spots on CNBC, MSNBC, FOX, and FOX Business, among others.
  • Minneapolis Fed’s Kashkari Calls for Stricter Lockdown
    Minneapolis Fed’s Kashkari Calls for Stricter Lockdown
    The president of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve calls for stricter lockdowns to help save the economy. The president of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve, who once claimed the Federal Reserve was flush with cash, called for a nationwide lockdown to fight COVID-19.  In an op-ed in The New York Times, Neel Kashkari and co-writer Michael T.
  • Defending Bitcoin’s Integrity in the Great Twitter Hack
    Defending Bitcoin’s Integrity in the Great Twitter Hack
    The recent Twitter hack has placed the words “Bitcoin” and “scam” in one headline again, though Bitcoin has nothing to do with it. Bitcoin (BTC) has made global headlines again because of the recent Twitter hack, but this time, we need to work harder to protect Bitcoin’s integrity and the progress the industry has made. The coordinated social engineering attack compromised the Twitter accounts of high-profile figures and organizations like Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, Tesla founder Elon Musk, Amazon owner Jeff Bezos, former United States President Barack Obama and 2020 US presidential candidate Joe Biden, among many others, to ask for Bitcoin in fake “giveaway” posts. When the story broke, the New York Times, BBC and other mainstream media outlets were quick to label the incident a “Bitcoin scam” or “crypto scam.” To have “Bitcoin” and “scam” used in the same breath in the global media may feel like all the work that’s gone into building trust for this revolutionary technology since its creation in 2009 has been for nothing. This is even more reason why companies and their communication teams must turn the publicity Bitcoin is getting now into a positive for the industry. Set the record straight: Bitcoin is not to blame The first point to clarify with the media, friends, family and newcomers is that this is a high-profile Twitter hack. This is not a “Bitcoin hack,” not a “Bitcoin Twitter hack” nor even a “Twitter Bitcoin hack” — as described by The Evening Standard and even Wired — because Bitcoin did not get hacked, nor did Bitcoin cause the hack. It’s even more concerning to see The Late Show with Stephen Colbert describe the hackers as “Bitcoin Bandits,” when the motives of the hackers have not been confirmed. Twitter is a centralized organization; it holds all users’ data and accounts in one place.
  • Ripple Boss Pays for 1,000 Cameras to Monitor San Francisco’s Streets
    Ripple Boss Pays for 1,000 Cameras to Monitor San Francisco’s Streets
    Source: Adobe/alice_photo Ripple co-founder and executive chairman Chris Larsen is spending his crypto-fortune on installing high-definition surveillance cameras around San Franciso, per a new report. According to the New York Times, Larsen has paid to have “a network of 1,000” cameras installed as part of an effort to cut down on crime – particularly theft – in the American city.
  • ‘I Failed Terribly at Keeping My Identity Secret’: Scott Alexander on the Value of Pseudonymity
    ‘I Failed Terribly at Keeping My Identity Secret’: Scott Alexander on the Value of Pseudonymity
    A New York Times decision to name Scott Alexander, the author of Slate Star Codex, raises questions about who deserves pseudonyms, journalism in 2020, and where we place value when it comes to news stories.